Smoked Pastrami

Smoked Pastrami

Smoked Pastrami

Saint Patrick’s Day is a good excuse to fire up your smoker for Smoked Pastrami this weekend. For this recipe I’m taking a Corned Beef brisket flat and turning it into fresh Pastrami.

I picked up a 4.5lb flat from my local grocery store this week to start the process. First you want to get most of the salt out of the corned beef for Pastrami.

Smoked Pastrami

Place the flat in a large plastic container and cover it with cool water. It’ll need to hang out in the refrigerator for at least 12 hours, and the water needs to be changed every 4 hours to remove the salt.

Once we’ve removed most of the salt, the flat is ready for a good rub.

Smoked Pastrami

Pastrami Rub Recipe:

  • ½ cup Restaurant Ground Black Pepper
  • ¼ cup Sugar in the Raw
  • 2 Tablespoons Granulated Garlic
  • 2 Tablespoons Ground Coriander
  • 1 Tablespoon Ground Mustard
  • 1 Tablespoon Onion Powder

Combine these ingredients in a bowl and place in a dredge shaker. Pastrami needs a good bit of rub, so don’t hold back when applying it. You want a heavy coat on all sides of the flat. Let it hang out at room temperature while the smoker comes up to temperature.

Smoked Pastrami

Today I’m firing up The Big Green Egg for this smoke but you can use any smoker set up for indirect cooking. Run the pit at 275 degrees and add a few chunks of Pecan and Cherry www.grillewood.com to the hot coals for smoke.

Smoked Pastrami

When the grill stabilizes at 275⁰, place the flat on the cooking grate and close the lid for 3 hours. At this point it will have absorbed plenty of smoke flavor and the bark should be just right. The internal will be somewhere around 160-165⁰.

Now it’s time to tenderize the Pastrami, and we do this by creating steam. You’ll need a ½ size aluminum pan and a cooling rack. Sit the rack in the bottom of the pan and pour in 2 cups of beef broth. The liquid should cover the bottom but not come over the rack.

Place the pastrami flat on the rack and insert a probe thermometer into the thickest part. Cover the pan with aluminum foil and continue cooking. The target internal temp is 202⁰ and it’ll take about 2 more hours to get there.

Smoked Pastrami

When the alarm goes off remove the Pastrami from the pan and place it directly on the cooking grate. It’ll be really hot, so you’ll want to wear some nitrile gloves with cotton liners. The steam softens the bark, so it needs about 15 minutes back on the grate to dry out.

Now the Pastrami is fully cooked but it needs to rest a little while before slicing. Just let it hang out on the cutting board for 20-30 minutes. You can cover it loosely with foil but don’t wrap it tight.

Smoked Pastrami

Slice the Pastrami across the grain with a sharp roast carving knife and cut it into whatever size slices you prefer. I like it very thin, so I can pile it high on a sandwich.

Smoked Pastrami

A Smoked Pastrami Ruben paired with a pint of Guinness is sure to bring you the “Luck of the Irish” on this Saint Paddy’s Day!

Save Recipe Save to BigOven
Yum
Smoked Pastrami
Rate this recipe

Smoked Pastrami

Ingredients

  • 4lb Corned Beef Brisket Flat
  • ½ cup Restaurant Ground Black Pepper
  • ¼ cup Sugar in the Raw
  • 2 Tablespoons Granulated Garlic
  • 2 Tablespoons Ground Coriander
  • 1 Tablespoon Ground Mustard
  • 1 Tablespoon Onion Powder
  • 2 cups Beef Broth

Instructions

  1. Place corned beef brisket flat in large container and cover with cool water. Keep container in refrigerator for 12 hours changing the water every 4 hours.
  2. Preheat Big Green Egg or other smoker/grill set up for indirect cooking. Bring temperature to 275⁰ and add chunks of pecan and cherry wood to hot coals for smoke.
  3. Remove brisket from water and pat dry with paper towel.
  4. Combine Black Pepper, Sugar, Garlic, Coriander, Mustard, & Onion Powder. Apply rub mixture over entire surface of brisket.
  5. Place Brisket Flat on smoker and cook for 3 hours.
  6. Pour beef broth into half size aluminum food service pan. Place brisket flat on wire cooling rack in pan, insert probe thermometer and cover pan with foil.
  7. Cook until internal temperature reaches 202⁰.
  8. Remove brisket from pan and place directly on cooking grate for 15 min.
  9. Rest brisket for 20-30 minutes loosely covered with aluminum foil.
  10. Slice pastrami across grain into desired thickness.

Malcom Reed
Connect on Facebook
Follow me on Twitter
Subscribe to my YouTube Channel
Find me on Google+
Follow me on Instagram

Buy Killer Hogs Products Here

Comments 17

  1. Thanks so much for creating this website it’s a ton of help! 1 question. Would you use the same time and temp on the grill for deer pastrami as you did for beef? I have 4 or 5 smaller loins and roasts as opposed to 1 big 5 pd roast.

    1. Post
      Author

      Not a lot of info to find out what went wrong. One idea is the smoker temp. If you have a lot of heat fluctuations during cooking you can expect it to be dryer at the end. You have to hold the temps steady.

      1. First of all all ovens-Smokers etc cook differently. I was always taught that a recipe is a guideline, not an absolute. You pay attention to what your cooking , if it is cooking too fast or drying out you make adjustments.

        1. Post
          Author
  2. You are awesome you never surprise me that’s some of the stuff you cook and smoke thanks a lot for all the lessons is highly appreciated

  3. I followed this recipe and got pretty good results. I had to extend time a bit but that’s just difference in cooking masterbilt vs green egg. I will definitely make it again. Thanks for posting.

    1. Post
      Author
  4. I have used this recipe several times and my friends & family love it. I am making another one today to help finish off some rye bread from this past weekend. All Malcom’s recipes I have followed are winners. That Football Explosion though, hot damn that was good. Keep it up Malcom!

    1. Post
      Author
  5. What size BGE do you use? I have a Large and the lump ran out while the flat was only at 184 degrees. Had to finish in oven, never had that happen. I was using the BGE lump and a pit probe and stayed within 275 (+/- 5 degrees) throughout. Any suggestions?

    1. Post
      Author

      This was an BGE XL – and I’ve had my BGE run for hours without checking up. But using the Pit Probe does seem to stoke it more and use more fuel. Jut try loading it up with lump and letting it burn slowly down…

  6. Made this over the Easter weekend, totally awesome! I followed your directions to a T. Son and son-in-law thought it was outstanding, called it meat candy! Thanks for the recipe and guidance. I made your smoked turkey last Thanksgiving and it was a total hit. Thanks Malcolm!

  7. I have smoked several corned beefs now and found this very helpful! I have one in the fridge soaking right now for smoking tomorrow! Thanks for all your tips and recipes Malcolm!

  8. Malcom I’m gona try this, this sunday hope it turns out ok ,its only a 2.5 pound corned beef. love the videos ,I’m learning a lot watching them thanks…

  9. the recipe looks great but the majority of other pastrami recipes ive read use pickling spice with the brine, is it not needed with a corned beef cut ?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *