The flat iron comes from the shoulder area of the cow. It’s the meat from the top blade roast inside the curve of the blade bone. You may see it called “top blade steak”, “patio steak”, or simply “top blade roast” The flat iron is a tender cut of beef – not come from the loin section, and it cooks very evenly due to its flat, uniform shape.

That’s where the name “flat iron” comes from… it looks like an old-timey iron.

The method for cooking this cut of beef is pretty simple.

The first thing is apply a generous coating of All Purpose seasoning. I’ve been experimenting with my own recipe but you can use any all purpose seasoning for beef or simply salt, black pepper, and garlic.

The base layer starts working into the meat and adds the initial flavor. Next place the steak in a large plastic bag and pour in 8oz of Moore’s Original Hickory marinade. I like the flavor Moore’s gives beef. It’s the perfect marinade for any cut of steak but I also use it on pork, chicken, or even wild game. You don’t have to worry about it being too salty like some other marinades on the market.

The flat iron needs to soak in the Marinade for at least 2 hours. I take it out of the refrigerator about 20 minutes before the end of the smoke to let it come to room temperature. After 2 hours remove it from the Moore’s marinade and let it drip dry for a few seconds.

Next season it with a good dose of Montreal Steak Seasoning I like Montreal and use it regularly as a final layer on brisket. The grind of the seasonings creates a nice texture on top of the meat as it cooks.

To grill the flat iron steak I fired up my Yoder pellet smoker. The great thing about the Yoder is that it can be set up to grill as well as smoke. I simply removed the heat shield and place a set of grill grates directly over the fire pot. It can reach temperatures up 600 degrees, so you can cook just about anything on it.

When the grill hit 350 degrees, it was time to start cooking. The steak went directly on the grates and I started my timer. To get awesome looking grill marks I give the meat a turn after 3 minutes before flipping. At the 6 minute mark it was time to flip the steak and repeat the whole process one more time.

It’s pretty much done after 12 minutes except for the all-important rest. Loosely cover the flat iron with foil and allow it to set on the counter for 10 minutes. This will keep all of the juices from running out onto the cutting board when you get ready to slice it.

As you can see from the photos the meat was a perfect Medium Rare which you’ve heard me say before is the only way to eat steak. I just the flat iron on a biased with really thin slices.

And this dude was good… it was tender and packed with flavor.

We used it to make fajitas with a corn salsa. But I’m planning on cooking it again and serving it with some horseradish sauce and buns.

It was so easy to cook and yielded a pretty good amount of meat – so I can easily see myself cooking this again for a crowd or a party. I think people would go crazy over this one…

If you’ve overlooked the Flat Iron Steak before I suggest you give it a try. It may not be the most glorious cut of bovine, but it’s mighty tasty and easy to prepare.

Malcom Reed
Killer Hogs BBQ Cooking Team
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About the Author

I am Malcom Reed and my brother, Waylon, and I are the Killer Hogs competition bbq team. Here at HowtoBBQright.com, I want to give you my secrets, methods and techniques you need to produce competition-quality BBQ. I want to give enough detail for BBQ novices, but still offer information that is useful for the professional BBQ cooks. I only focus on REAL bbq. And I take it seriously.

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