smoked brisket

Smoked Brisket Recipe

Smoked Brisket Recipe

The best smoked brisket I’ve experienced was cooked on a stick burner pit, and now it’s my personal mission to recreate that brisket using one of these style pits. Really, there’s no better cut of meat more perfect for a stick burner than smoked brisket.

The basics of a stick burner are simple. You start a fire in the offset firebox, the heat and smoke roll into the cooking chamber, and it’s drawn out by a large stack on the end.

Smoked Brisket

The most difficult part is maintaining the fire for hours upon hours. You don’t walk away from a stick burner for long periods of time, but this is what makes cooking on one of these pits fun.

smoked brisket

I don’t get aggressive with the trimming on the brisket. I remove some of the thick fat that connects the flat and point and any sinew from on top of the flat. Take off any grey or discolored meat from the sides (this is just the areas exposed to more oxygen during processing). Flip the brisket over and trim the bottom layer of fat to 1/4”.

smoked brisket

For the seasoning, I use a simple mixture of equal parts Kosher Salt and Corse Ground Black Pepper along with a light coat of my Killer Hogs Hot Rub for the seasoning but you can use your favorite rub as well.

smoked brisket

Once the pit is running at 275 degrees, place the brisket inside and maintain the fire by adding splits of wood. I used Pecan but you can use post oak, hickory, or your favorite wood just make sure it’s seasoned (has low moisture content). To keep the pit running I’ve found that the fire needs a new stick of wood every 45 minutes.

smoked brisket

When the outside of the brisket starts turning dark, wrap the brisket in butcher paper and continue to cook. This brisket took around 4-5 hours before it had the color it needed to wrap.

smoked brisket

For the wrap, I place 2 sheets of butcher paper (food grade wrapping paper) overlapping on a table. Then just wrap the butcher in the paper so it’s tight and has plenty of insulation. This helps push through the stall without damaging the bark.

smoked brisket

Use a probe thermometer inserted into the center of the flat to monitor internal temperature. It’s done once it gets to roughly 200 degrees internal. To monitor the internal temp while the Brisket was cooking, I used a Thermoworks Signals. And to verify the Brisket internal temp, I used a Thermapen Mk4.

smoked brisket

Rest the brisket in a dry cooler for at least an hour to let the cooking process stop and ensure a juicy end product. THE REST IS KEY! You’ll loose a lot of moisture and tenderness if you slice right into the brisket after cooking.

smoked brisket

When you’re ready to serve, slice the flat into 1/4” thick slices against the grain. For the point I go a little thicker and always cut a few burnt ends from the edges (my favorite part!).

smoked brisket

This smoked brisket on my new Jambo Stick Burner was a dang fine brisket! It was so tender, had so much moisture and a great flavor. Plus you get that nice smoke ring from a stick burner and a great, light smoky flavor.

I have to say, I’m really enjoying chasing that perfect Texas Style Brisket!

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Smoked Brisket Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1 Whole Packer Brisket 13lbs avg.
  • 2 Tablespoons Kosher Salt
  • 2 Tablespoons Corse Ground Black Pepper
  • 2 Tablespoons Killer Hogs Hot Rub

Instructions

  1. Prepare offset Bbq pit for indirect cooking at 275 degrees using splits of Pecan wood for fuel. (Any style pit can be substituted just maintain 275 degrees)
  2. Remove brisket from cryovac packaging and blot excess moisture with paper towel. Trim excess fat to 1/4”. Remove sinew (silver skin) from flat and any discolored meat around the edges.
  3. Combine Kosher Salt and Black Pepper and liberally coat all sides of the brisket then add a light layer of Killer Hogs Hot Rub.
  4. Place the brisket fat side down on the Bbq pit and smoke until the outside begins to turn dark (about 170 degrees internal).
  5. Wrap the brisket in pink butchers paper and insert a probe thermometer into the thickest portion of the flat.
  6. Place the brisket back on the pit and continue to cook until internal temperature reaches 202-204 degrees.
  7. Rest the brisket in a dry cooler for a minimum of 1 hour before slicing.

Malcom Reed
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smoked brisket

Comments 6

  1. I cant seem to land a coleslaw recipe for Carolina pulled pork sandwiches. Do you have a favorite recipe that you use?

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      Author
  2. Thank you for the brisket tips.I love watching your videos on Youtube.I have learned alot from just rewatching them over and over.My 9 year old son even enjoys them as much as I do.The only question I have is,I have a Masterbuilt verticle smoker.Does that matter? Instead of using a stuck smoker like you did? The Masterbuilt I’ve got is a really good model smoker,but I haven’t done anything quit this big as a brisket,just mostly deer steaks and cornish hens and sliced potatoes.What wood would you recommend for doing deer steaks and salmon? Thank you, and keep up the awesome videos.Your an awesome BBQ PITMASTER!!

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      Author
  3. Hello Malcom. Thanks for the great brisket video. I really enjoy watching all of your videos. Just last weekend I did a boston butt on my Weber Smokey Mountain, following your instructions of course. It turned out great, but the cook time was about 1 1/2 hours longer than anticipated. Lesson learned. I am planning to tackle a brisket next. I know you always say cook to a temerature, but can you tell me the approximate weight of this cook, and about how long it took, total time? Thanks in advance!

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      Author

      It all depends on your equipment, the weather, and the cut of meat… Just give yourself plenty of time. If it gets done early, place it in a dry cooler and let it rest. It will stay warm and just keep getting better for up to 6 hours.

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